DREW PISARRA

★ ★ ★ ★

POETRY

Sonnet 10-4

When the end first came, I wrote you a poem,
then I wrote another when it ended
again. Our breakup just kept on going
and going as if we had intended
to never be friends. It was lovers or
nothing, good-for-nothing at that. My heart
broke more often than cheap dinnerware. Your
crack about how our romance came in spurts
was the double entendre that made me
laugh ’til it hurt. I could write you more rhymes
of what I’ll miss, of our urbanity,
of chances lost, of verse undone. At times,
your going seems Shakespearean. Alack!
You stole my heart but I don’t want you back.

Drew Pisarra’s poetry pops up in untraditional places—one was a short film (“18 Kisses of Significance”); another became an art house song (“The Somnambulist”); another was read by a naked person at a literary festival. He wrote the libretto for the dance opera Lady M in verse and co-curated a series of movie haiku for a theater marquee in NYC. He is not afraid of rhyme.

DEAR READER

At The Wild Word we are proud to present some of the best online writing around, as well as being a platform for new and emerging writers and artists.

As a non-profit, the entire site is a labour of love.

If you have read the work in The Wild Word and like what we do, please put something in our tip jar to keep this amazing platform alive.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT!